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TU Dresden » Faculty of Mechanical Science and Engineering » Institute for Materials Science » Chair of Materials Science and Nanotechnology



Thursday, 21 April 2011
(at 10:00 in room 115, Hallwachsstr. 3)
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Communications systems, fluid dynamics, and some fundamentals in physics

Alfred Fettweis

Chair for Communications Engineering
Ruhr University Bochum
  Germany  






Strict validity of Maxwell's equations in vacuum is assumed, even at smallest dimensions. Concepts of field velocity v, rest field, basal electromagnetic (EM) field etc. are defined. By rigorous deduction, this leads to flow equations that have the same structure as those of fluid dynamics and thus in fact describe an EM fluid.

Electron and photon models are presented; they turn out to be condensed turbulences in the EM fluid (primary level). Since energy migration is caused both by convection (flow) and by work done by the forces, it occurs with a velocity &gev (secondary level); it obeys classical relativistic dynamics. The same holds for an electron model moving as a whole in an external (electrostatic, gravitational) field (tertiary level), but for the EM fluid itself (primary level) we encounter the laws of what has been called alternative relativistic dynamics. Determining the fine-structure constant reduces to a purely mathematical problem (still to be solved numerically). The photon model possesses all properties known to hold, thus leading to a fully natural interpretation of the wave-particle duality. No incompatibilities occur between relativity and quantum physics.

Brief Bio:

Alfred Fettweis, Emeritus Professor for communications engineering.

Born 27 November 1926 in Eupen, Belgium.

Education:
Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium: 1946-1951 Student electrical engineering, 1951 Diploma: Ingénieur civil électricien, 1963 Docteur en sciences appliquées.
1954-56: Part-time graduate student, Columbia University and Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, both New York, USA.

Career:
1951-1963 International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation (ITT) in Belgium (1951-1954 and 1956-1963) and USA (1954-1956). 1963-1967 Professor of theoretical electricity, Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands. Since 1967 Professor for communications engineering, Ruhr-Universität Bochum; emeritus professor since 1992. 1994-1996 Visiting Distinguished Professor, University of Notre Dame, Indiana, USA.

Honorary doctorates:
1986 Link\F6ping University, Sweden; 1988 Faculté Polytechnique de Mons, Belgium; 1988 Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium; 1995 Technical University Budapest, Hungary; 2004 Politechnika Poznanska, Poznan, Poland.

Membership in Academies:
Nordrhein-Westfälische Akademie der Wissenschaften (since 1975); Academia Scientiarum et Artium Europaea, Salzburg/Vienna (since 1991), Academia Europaea, London (since 1992); acatech - Deutsche Akademie der Technikwissenschaften (1997 Konvent, 2002 acatech, 2008 DATW).

Awards:
Belgium: Prix ‘Acta Technica Belgica‘ 1962-63; Prix 1980 de la Fondation Montefiore, Liège.
Germany: VDE-Ehrenring 1984; Karl-Küpfmüller-Preis der Informationstechnischen Gsellschaft im VDE 1988; Basic Research Award of the Eduard Rhein Foundation.
USA: Cettnial Medal 1984, Third Millennium Medal 2000; Gustav Robert Kirchhoff Award.
IEEE Circuits and Systems Society (USA): Darlington Prize Paper Award 1980; Technical Achievement Award 1988; Golden Jubilee Award 1999; Van Valkenburg Award 2001; Vitold Belevitch Award 2003.
England: Peter-Johns Prize, International Journal of Numerical Modelling 1993.

Major research activities:
Theory of Kirchhoff circuits, electric filters, theory of communications systems, digital signal processing, wave digital filters, multidimensional stability, robust numerical integration of partial differential equations, fundamentals at border communications/physics.



related paper (pdf)

Invited by G. Cuniberti

Within the Sonder nanoSeminar

last modified: 2018.10.24 Mi
author: webadmin