- characterization of intermediate species during the self-assembly process
-nanostructural characterization
- deeper understanding of the self-assemby in order to predict and guide the outcome of the assembly process"> - characterization of intermediate species during the self-assembly process
-nanostructural characterization
- deeper understanding of the self-assemby in order to predict and guide the outcome of the assembly process"> TUD, chair Cuniberti "materials science and nanotechnology" - Lehrstuhl Cuniberti "Materialwissenschaft und Nanotechnik"
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TU Dresden » Faculty of Mechanical Science and Engineering » Institute for Materials Science » Chair of Materials Science and Nanotechnology



Thursday, 24 May 2012
(at 13:00 in room 115, Hallwachsstr. 3)
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Peptide based nanostructures - Interfacial self-assembly, nanostructure and morphological diversity

Hans-Georg Braun

Division Biofunctional Polymer Materials
Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials and Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden
  Germany  






Short oligopeptide molecules of appropriate amnoacide composition turn out to be excellent building blocks of "Supramolecular Polymers". In contrast to "real polymers" which since the early days of Staudinger are regarded as long molecules made from "covalent bound" small monomer units supramolecular polymers are regarded as macromolecular units assembled from small monomer units and stabilized by strong forces from non-covalent molecular interactions namely hydrogene bonds or pi-pi stacking. Reversibility of the non-covalent bonding interactions as compared with the irreversibility of covalent bonded polymer favors an enormous variabilty of morphological structural elements. Ongoing an intensifying reserach in particular on diphenylalanine based oligopeptide assemblies from Israelian (Gazit), Korean (Ryu and Park) and British (Ulijn) researchers present a growing number of interesting physical and materials properties of these compounds which indicates them as "high potentials" in nanoscopic and mesoscopic building blocks: The lecture focuses on recent results on self-assembly of oligopeptide buiding blocks at liquid/gas interfaces, new structural insights into the crystallographic features of the systems. Nevertheless it will also address a number of unresolved problems to be solved. The open problems mainly refer to
- characterization of intermediate species during the self-assembly process
-nanostructural characterization
- deeper understanding of the self-assemby in order to predict and guide the outcome of the assembly process

Brief Bio:

From 1974-1984 study of chemistry at the Albert-Ludwigs University Freiburg.;Diploma thesis and PhD work on structural and mechanistic aspects of solid-state photo-polymerisations at the Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry Uni Freiburg under supervision of G. Wegner.;First interaction with general material sciene during a 6 month stay at the Dept. of Material Science (Prof. H. Gleiter) at the University of Saarbruecken followed by a 1 year post-doc stay at the Dept. Of Chemical Engineering Kyoto University (Prof. Hashimoto). From 1985 to 1994 industrial experience as Head of the Electron Microscopy Lab. in the Dept. of Polymer-physics , Central Research Unit of BASF Ludwigshafen. Since 1994 doing independent research at the Leibnitz Institute of Polymer Research / Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials on the general topic of "Structure formation at interfaces and in confinements"; 2011 Habilitation at the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering TUD; Private interests: Hiking, Travelling, Science and Elephants

Invited by G. Cuniberti

Within the nanoSeminar

last modified: 2018.10.24 Mi
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