Graphene 2011

Cover
Start: 11 Apr 2011 | End: 14 Apr 2011
Location: Bilbao, Spain
Organized by: A. Correira, A. Loiseau, S. Roche

Graphene is a two-dimensional monolayer of sp² bonded carbon atoms in a dense honeycomb crystal structure which behaves electronically as a zero-gap semiconductor. Its discovery in 2004 has sparked a considerable scientific activity that has now established a broad international community with interest in both fundamental properties of a unique material, together with a wealth of foreseen applications in fields as nanoelectronics (high-frequency devices,..), electromechanics, optics, photonics, sensing, NEMS,\u2026Exceptional electronic properties of this material, resulting in carrier mobilities as large as several thousands of cm²/Vs, make this material at the heart of the alternatives for the so-called beyond-CMOS nanoelectronics research. The current carrying capability of graphene is orders of magnitude higher than that of metals. Additionally, graphene is CMOS compatible and can be handled by standard planar technology, which should result in highest integration of device density in the medium run. Graphene devices are also believed to work at much lower supply voltages and should therefore result in lower power consumption. Therefore graphene has the potential to increase computing performance, functionality and communication speed far beyond the expected limits of conventional CMOS technology, which is related with large financial markets in the microelectronics business. Additionally, the reports of novel functionalities in graphene devices such as sensing capability, electro-mechanical effects (e.g. resonators) and spintronics effects also profile some new perspectives for innovative applications. Those salient features will be at the heart of GRAPHENE 2011 that will present the state of the art of the field.

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Graphene 2011

Cover
Start: 11 Apr 2011 | End: 14 Apr 2011
Location: Bilbao, Spain
Organized by: A. Correira, A. Loiseau, S. Roche

Graphene is a two-dimensional monolayer of sp² bonded carbon atoms in a dense honeycomb crystal structure which behaves electronically as a zero-gap semiconductor. Its discovery in 2004 has sparked a considerable scientific activity that has now established a broad international community with interest in both fundamental properties of a unique material, together with a wealth of foreseen applications in fields as nanoelectronics (high-frequency devices,..), electromechanics, optics, photonics, sensing, NEMS,\u2026Exceptional electronic properties of this material, resulting in carrier mobilities as large as several thousands of cm²/Vs, make this material at the heart of the alternatives for the so-called beyond-CMOS nanoelectronics research. The current carrying capability of graphene is orders of magnitude higher than that of metals. Additionally, graphene is CMOS compatible and can be handled by standard planar technology, which should result in highest integration of device density in the medium run. Graphene devices are also believed to work at much lower supply voltages and should therefore result in lower power consumption. Therefore graphene has the potential to increase computing performance, functionality and communication speed far beyond the expected limits of conventional CMOS technology, which is related with large financial markets in the microelectronics business. Additionally, the reports of novel functionalities in graphene devices such as sensing capability, electro-mechanical effects (e.g. resonators) and spintronics effects also profile some new perspectives for innovative applications. Those salient features will be at the heart of GRAPHENE 2011 that will present the state of the art of the field.

Share