Spin selective transport in helical molecules
Master, Diplom
Cover

Recent experimental work has shown a strong spin-dependent response in molecular systems like DNA, a-helices, and helicene . This is in so far unexpected as organic systems usually display very weak spin-orbit effects. A common feature to all studied systems is however their helical structure. Model-based approaches have suggested a delicate interplay between helical symmetry and a non-conventional spin-orbit coupling, which could be responsible for the observed spin sensitivity. This chirality-induced spin selectivity can open the door to extensive applications of helical systems in the field of spintronics, thus creating viable alternatives to currently existing semiconductor-based spintronic devices.
Goal of this Thesis is the formulation of a theoretical framework to describe spin-dependent transport in helical systems both in the coherent and incoherent transport regimes.

The research plan will include:
1. Becoming familiar with nanoscale electron transport
2. Learning Master equation techniques
3. Formulation of a model Hamiltonian for helical systems including spin-orbit coupling
4. Numerical solution of the problem and comparison to experiments, whenever possible



Group
Projects

Spin selective transport in helical molecules
Master, Diplom
Cover

Recent experimental work has shown a strong spin-dependent response in molecular systems like DNA, a-helices, and helicene . This is in so far unexpected as organic systems usually display very weak spin-orbit effects. A common feature to all studied systems is however their helical structure. Model-based approaches have suggested a delicate interplay between helical symmetry and a non-conventional spin-orbit coupling, which could be responsible for the observed spin sensitivity. This chirality-induced spin selectivity can open the door to extensive applications of helical systems in the field of spintronics, thus creating viable alternatives to currently existing semiconductor-based spintronic devices.
Goal of this Thesis is the formulation of a theoretical framework to describe spin-dependent transport in helical systems both in the coherent and incoherent transport regimes.

The research plan will include:
1. Becoming familiar with nanoscale electron transport
2. Learning Master equation techniques
3. Formulation of a model Hamiltonian for helical systems including spin-orbit coupling
4. Numerical solution of the problem and comparison to experiments, whenever possible



Supervisor contact

Group
Projects