Testimonial for the German Embassy in Rome

Aug. 26, 2022

I live and work in Dresden...


Full article

I live and work in Dresden, the capital of Saxony, a city with half a million inhabitants, a great cultural and industrial past, and a present of a powerful innovative push. Over the past 30 years, it has literally transformed into one of the most beautiful and livable cities I know. A "treat" especially for families: the very green city is child-friendly with high-value primary and secondary public schools that are among the first in Germany in the OCSE-PISA rankings. However, Dresden has been heavily felt since the reunification due to the impressive development in the field of research and technology, being today a global leader in electronics, materials science and biotechnology. At TU Dresden, one of the eleven universities of excellence in Germany, I head the department of materials science and nanotechnology led by a group of sixty scientists, right at the convergence of these areas. We develop and integrate new materials for electronics and energy and environmental technologies. Recently, we made pioneering discoveries in the field of electronic noses, which can detect and distinguish even the smallest concentration of specific gases. Researchers in Dresden benefit from a stimulating environment for research and industry. More than 30 research institutes work closely under the roof of the DRESDEN-concept, a strong alliance covering all phases of the innovation process, from basic science to applied research and technological transfer. Global industries with high-tech content such as Infineon, GlobalFoundries, and Bosch and a vital ecosystem of startups and consolidated SMEs make Dresden Europe’s largest electronic cluster. Living and working in a city where art, history, and culture meet science and technology is one of the best constellations I can imagine. A long day in the lab may end up enjoying a world-class show at the Semper Opera. And during the break, you always meet a colleague to discuss science and start new projects!


Related team member

Testimonial for the German Embassy in Rome

Aug. 26, 2022

I live and work in Dresden...


Full article

I live and work in Dresden, the capital of Saxony, a city with half a million inhabitants, a great cultural and industrial past, and a present of a powerful innovative push. Over the past 30 years, it has literally transformed into one of the most beautiful and livable cities I know. A "treat" especially for families: the very green city is child-friendly with high-value primary and secondary public schools that are among the first in Germany in the OCSE-PISA rankings. However, Dresden has been heavily felt since the reunification due to the impressive development in the field of research and technology, being today a global leader in electronics, materials science and biotechnology. At TU Dresden, one of the eleven universities of excellence in Germany, I head the department of materials science and nanotechnology led by a group of sixty scientists, right at the convergence of these areas. We develop and integrate new materials for electronics and energy and environmental technologies. Recently, we made pioneering discoveries in the field of electronic noses, which can detect and distinguish even the smallest concentration of specific gases. Researchers in Dresden benefit from a stimulating environment for research and industry. More than 30 research institutes work closely under the roof of the DRESDEN-concept, a strong alliance covering all phases of the innovation process, from basic science to applied research and technological transfer. Global industries with high-tech content such as Infineon, GlobalFoundries, and Bosch and a vital ecosystem of startups and consolidated SMEs make Dresden Europe’s largest electronic cluster. Living and working in a city where art, history, and culture meet science and technology is one of the best constellations I can imagine. A long day in the lab may end up enjoying a world-class show at the Semper Opera. And during the break, you always meet a colleague to discuss science and start new projects!


Related team member