Functionalized Graphene Surfaces for Selective Gas Sensing
Adina Luican-Mayer
University of Ottawa, Canada

June 2, 2022, 1 p.m.
https://tinyurl.com/nanoSeminar-GA

Linkedin


Material systems, devices, and circuits, based on the manipulation of individual charges, spins, and photons in solid-state platforms are key for revolutionary quantum technologies. The burgeoning field of quantum two-dimensional (2D) materials presents an emerging opportunity for breakthroughs in the development of next-generation quantum technologies while also pushing the boundaries of fundamental understanding in condensed matter. Our laboratory aims to create quantum functionality in 2D systems by combining fabrication and assembly techniques of 2D layers with atomically precise scanning probe microscopy.
In this talk, I will focus on three research directions. Firstly, I will discuss scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy experiments aimed at elucidating the nature of atomic-scale defects in 2D materials and at creating novel moiré structures by twisting 2D layers. Secondly, I will present our progress in realizing quantum-confined devices in 2D semiconductors. Lastly, I will show how we leverage our expertise in probing and engineering electronic states at surfaces of 2D materials to further the development of graphene-based gas sensors.

[1] Phys. Rev. B 102 (20), 205408, (2020)
[2] Journal of Applied Physics, (2020)
[3] Applied Physics Letters 119 (13), 133104 (2021)
[4] ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 13, 51, 61751 (2021)

Brief CV

Adina Luican-Mayer is an assistant professor in the Physics Department at uOttawa since January 2016. She received her undergraduate degree from Jacobs University Bremen in Germany (2006) and her PhD in Physics from Rutgers University (2012). Prior to joining uOttawa, she was the Alexei Abrikosov distinguished postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne National Laboratory. Her research group focuses on uncovering the novel electronic properties of low-dimensional quantum systems using scanning probe microscopy and supporting spectroscopic techniques.



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Functionalized Graphene Surfaces for Selective Gas Sensing
Adina Luican-Mayer
University of Ottawa, Canada

June 2, 2022, 1 p.m.
https://tinyurl.com/nanoSeminar-GA

Linkedin


Material systems, devices, and circuits, based on the manipulation of individual charges, spins, and photons in solid-state platforms are key for revolutionary quantum technologies. The burgeoning field of quantum two-dimensional (2D) materials presents an emerging opportunity for breakthroughs in the development of next-generation quantum technologies while also pushing the boundaries of fundamental understanding in condensed matter. Our laboratory aims to create quantum functionality in 2D systems by combining fabrication and assembly techniques of 2D layers with atomically precise scanning probe microscopy.
In this talk, I will focus on three research directions. Firstly, I will discuss scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy experiments aimed at elucidating the nature of atomic-scale defects in 2D materials and at creating novel moiré structures by twisting 2D layers. Secondly, I will present our progress in realizing quantum-confined devices in 2D semiconductors. Lastly, I will show how we leverage our expertise in probing and engineering electronic states at surfaces of 2D materials to further the development of graphene-based gas sensors.

[1] Phys. Rev. B 102 (20), 205408, (2020)
[2] Journal of Applied Physics, (2020)
[3] Applied Physics Letters 119 (13), 133104 (2021)
[4] ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 13, 51, 61751 (2021)

Brief CV

Adina Luican-Mayer is an assistant professor in the Physics Department at uOttawa since January 2016. She received her undergraduate degree from Jacobs University Bremen in Germany (2006) and her PhD in Physics from Rutgers University (2012). Prior to joining uOttawa, she was the Alexei Abrikosov distinguished postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne National Laboratory. Her research group focuses on uncovering the novel electronic properties of low-dimensional quantum systems using scanning probe microscopy and supporting spectroscopic techniques.



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